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Steamed Sago Cake – Kueh Sagu

In Recipes, Singaporean on September 26, 2010 at 7:10 pm

I’ve been refraining as much as possible from buying new ingredients at the Asian supermarket, because they all come in packs of 500g – 1kg and I’m just about to move across town. Don’t want to be carting additional boxes of ingredients when I already have a massive amount of stuff to worry about. And so I decided to convert the remains of my packet of tapioca pearls into one of my favourite nyonya kueh for a recent international gathering. Steamed sago cake a.k.a. kueh sagu! But naturally, if I ever attempt to make anything, it’s of course ‘one of my favourites’, why else do I go through the effort then?


Just what is sago? And what are tapioca pearls and why do I seem to use it so interchangeably? NO, they are not FROG EGGS (in reference to their appearance) contrary to some Western belief that resulted from too much mischievous Asian teasing. Both are actually starches of very similar characteristics (transparent and chewy), and are produced in the form of granules or ‘pearls’ to be used conveniently for cooking. The former is obtained from the pith of the sago palm stem, while the latter is obtained from the cassava root. Nothing weird about it at all. Just starch, like potato starch, corn starch, wheat starch… made into a more convenient and potentially innovative form.

Yep, so here’s yet another green recipe (apart from ondeh ondeh and kueh dadar that I’ve been making frequently in the past year). It just happens that I never see any pressing need to obtain other colours for my recipes, apart from the green of my pandan paste. I hope that I’m not sending the wrong message that nyonya kueh are all green in colour, because they’re not and hopefully I will have a chance to show you soon πŸ™‚


Kueh Sagu Recipe modified from here

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup pearl sago / tapioca pearls
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • a few drops of pandan paste
  • 1/2 tsp pandan essence (or 1 tsp pandan essence + colouring)
  • 20g dessicated coconut with a pinch of salt mixed in

Method:

  1. Soak the pearls in a generous amount of water (1L maybe?) and leave aside for 1h. Will double to triple in volume.
  2. Drain away excess water then mix in sugar and pandan paste / essence.
  3. Transfer to a greased pot / bowl that fits in your steamer. Here’s how to do it if you don’t have a steamer.
  4. Steam on high heat for 20min.
  5. Cool and coat with dessicated coconut while cutting into bite-sized pieces.

Alternative spellings of the name: sago kueh / kuih sago

Variations on the recipe: create layers by splitting into 2 batches after flavouring with sugar and pandan essence. Add an additional few drops of pandan paste to colour one batch green. Steam the white layer for 10 min, then pour the green batch over and steam for another 20min.

Other variations: colour with other colours and make layers the same way, or use coconut palm sugar (gula melaka) in place of white sugar!

FAB – Chinese Custard Egg Tarts

In Baking, Chinese, Recipes on May 21, 2010 at 3:25 pm

Today’s FAB session was especially quick and hassle-free. From gathering the ingredients till washing up and giving away / gobbling up the tarts — all done within 1 hour! It happened so quick, I thought I might as well complete the entire cycle and make the post right away, while the 4 tummies in this house are still digesting happily.

Back in ’96-’98 when my family was living in Hongkong, I often delighted in the weekly dose of freshly baked custard egg tarts from the bakery nearby my piano school. Aaah… definitely the most lovely memories from those weekly lessons πŸ˜› Those fresh-baked dan tat with their flaky pastries and sweet wobbly eggy filling were absolutely heart- and tummy-warmingly heavenly ~*

Btw, flaky tart cases are now on sale (got sale got S’porean) at fakta / netto for 8kr (~1 euro / SGD$2) for 10 pieces of convenient goodies. What are you waiting for?

Chinese Custard Egg Tarts adapted from Chow Times

  • 1 egg
  • 160ml whole milk
  • 40g sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla essence
  • 10 ready-made tart shells
  1. Preheat the oven to 200˚C.
  2. Warm the sugar with the milk in the microwave for about 30s until lukewarm (just to dissolve the sugar).
  3. Mix the egg and vanilla essence into the sweetened milk and strain to remove any lumps.
  4. Pour into tart shells (fill to the rim as it will decrease in height as water evaporates) and bake for 12-14min.
  5. Eat them straight from the oven for maximum enjoyment!

*Adjust the sugar for your desired level of sweetness. Mine were slightly less sweet than the one’s at the shop, but I love it this way! πŸ™‚

Look at that quivery custard!

Chinese Steamed Bun – εŒ…子

In Chinese, Recipes on May 19, 2010 at 8:19 am

I’ve always thought that I needed one of these in order to steam my food:

Apparently not! As long as you have a pot / pan (with a lid) that is big enough to enclose some kind of container on a stand (e.g. small bowl), steaming is just as easy as putting a pot of water to boil. Here’s how I do mine: fill the base of a large pot with 3-4cm height of water, place a bowl in the centre, then I lay the plate of food to be steamed on top of the bowl. πŸ™‚

Great. Now you have no excuse not to try out steamed recipes.

Steaming food is a healthier choice because it doesn’t require the addition of oil and nutrients are not leached into boiling water. Moreover, the steam keeps the food moist and tender…AND busy / lazy people don’t have to watch it closely (as long as the water at the base does not dry out, your food and house will be safe) so it’s easy to cook the food well without spending much time at the stove.

Evidently, it isn’t used much in Western kitchens, but Asians use this method to cook almost anything — fish, meat, sweet potatoes, eggs, rice, soups, noodles, cakes, breads… Perhaps the common usage of this healthy method is part of the answer to the Westerner’s constant dwelling on ‘why are Asians so skinny’, apart from ‘burning energy picking up food with chopsticks’ lol. I guarantee that you can expect more steamed recipes to pop up soon!

First up, here’s a simple recipe for the Chinese steamed bun a.k.a. baozi (if filled) / mantou (if unfilled), which I often grab from the school canteen in Singapore for 60cents (30 euro cents, 2.5kr). Steaming bread is faster than baking it, and produces a texture that is both soft and moist. With many sweet and savory fillings to choose from – char siew, cabbage, corn, red bean paste, yam, lotus paste, etc etc… it is one of those grab-and-go breakfasts / snacks that is both satisfying and comforting. πŸ™‚

Steamed Chinese Bun recipe adapted from standard baozi / mantou recipe

  • 400g plain / cake flour — I used 340g plain + 60g potato starch (usually corn starch)
  • 1-2 tsp yeast / half a yeast cake
  • 1 tsp baking powder (optional)
  • 50g sugar
  • 180ml warm water / milk
  • 2 tbsp oil
  1. Mix the yeast and warm water together.
  2. Mix dry ingredients together then rub in oil evenly (tenderizer by limiting gluten formation)
  3. Combine and knead into a soft dough.
  4. Cover with a damp cloth and leave aside to rise for 2h.
  5. Shape dough into a log of about 4cm in diameter. Cut into 2-3cm segments, flatten / roll into a round and wrap your desired filling (any finely chopped stir-fries or sweet pastes or anything you’d willingly eat with soft white bread – I had in mine cabbage and corn stir-fried with garlic, onions, chili, pepper and oyster sauce). Place on a square of baking paper to prevent it sticking to the plate.
  6. Steam for 8-10min and serve warm!
  7. If you’re lazy to make the filling, you can make mantou from the dough by rolling it out into a sheet, then rolling it up like a swiss roll, and cut to desired shape. Here’s a good pictorial instruction. Good to eat with anything with a gravy (e.g. Singaporean Chilli Crab!!) or your stir-fries (you can serve it on a side like the Europeans do with boiled potatoes!)

Note: Remember to leave enough space between the buns, it expands about 50% of its size after steaming!

Refrigerate the extras and just pop it into the microwave for 30s and… voila! Soft chewy buns!

FAB – Chewy Tofu Coconut Cookies

In Baking, Friday Afternoon Baking, Recipes on May 15, 2010 at 3:40 pm

A couple of weeks ago, silken tofu was on sale at the supermarket Netto, and I couldn’t resist grabbing one tetrapack off the shelf despite it still being 5 times the price I would normally pay (as opposed to 15x–I’ve seen the same tofu selling for a ridiculous SGD$11/ 5.50 Euros elsewhere). I miss tofu and all its soy relatives– silken, pressed, skin, dried, puffed, stuffed… tempeh, doubanjiang, edamame, soy milk/yoghurt/icecream…. hmm perhaps even some natto on my rice now would make me one happy girl.

Unbelievably this block of tofu survived uneaten for 2 weeks. Each time I’d reach for it and promptly put it back, hoping for recipe inspirations that would be befitting of tofu’s current gold-worthy status. I have no idea why I’m making such a big fuss about paying SGD$4– it’s not expensive per se (by Danish standards) but only expensive by comparison. Sometimes I’m just so stubborn. The good news is that in less than 7 weeks, I will be sitting by Mr Bean at Bukit Batok, pigging out on soya bean ice cream after stuffing my face with tahu goreng and yong tau foo… ahhh heaven.

It was just about time for another FAB session, hence I finally willed myself to let go of my dear tofu and make some cookies out of it. I figured that perhaps if I made the tofu into 50 cookies, I’ll at least enjoy its deliciousness over a greater number of days HA! I used about 3/4 of the block to make Susan’s Okara cookie recipe (and kept the rest to enjoy in a nice bowl of noodle soup). I actually had absolutely no idea until recently that tofu can be used as a fat replacer in baked recipes. Evidently, almost anything that disrupts the gluten network formation in baked goods (a balance of tougheners and tenderizers) can be used to some effect as a fat replacer — with inevitable textural changes of course, but nevertheless with very yummy results. πŸ™‚


This recipe yields 50 small soft chewy cookies with the nutty bite of sunflower seeds, light crunch of coconut shreds and the mild fragrance of soy bean and vanilla. Put it back into the oven for 5-10 min longer if you’d like more of a crisp edge on the cookie for additional crunch and a popcorn-type roasty flavour.

Tofu Coconut Cookies adapted from FatFree Vegan Kitchen

  • 50g unsweetened coconut flakes
  • 120g flour
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 140g sugar
  • 250g firm tofu pureed
  • 1.5 tsp vanilla extract
  • handful of sunflower seeds (or any nuts/seeds that you desire)
  • (3 tbsp water if necessary)

1. Preheat the oven to 190˚C.
2. Combine all the ingredients together in a large bowl (tofu last).
3. Add some water (2-3tbsp) to make a thick batter that holds shape.
4. Spoon heaping teaspoons onto a baking sheet and flatten with the back of the spoon.
5. Bake for about 15-20min until slightly browned on the surface and crisp on the edges. Cookies will absorb some moisture upon cooling, so it doesn’t hurt to have the cookies a little drier/harder than you want it before taking it out of the oven.
6. Store in air tight boxes once cooled.

Min Chiang Kueh | Apam Balik

In Recipes, Singaporean on May 9, 2010 at 12:25 am

It’s probably only in Singapore and Malaysia that you’d have two very different names for the same food. With our multi-ethnic composition, it’s very natural for cultural boundaries to be blurred and cuisines to be merged– hmm, I just couldn’t figure / find out whether this is supposed to be a Chinese pancake or a Malay pancake… so, let’s simply call it Singaporean / Malaysian!

I noticed while looking through recipes for Min Chiang Kueh that ‘alkaline water’ was a recurring ingredient in most recipes. Whenever the word ‘alkaline’ pops up, there’s always something interesting to say about the recipe. After all, how often do you add stuff that tastes like soap to your food? Or try this: name as many acidic foods as you can, and now try to name the alkaline ones. Umm baking soda (chemical leavener), ehhh egg white (very slightly alkaline), ehhhmmm sodium hydroxide (used to make Chinese century eggs or to make pretzels a rich dark brown!), uhhh… *blank*

Alkali is simply not normally found in food environments, but it sure has some useful properties — for instance, enhancing the Maillard reaction! [Let’s save the century egg chemistry for another day.] As spoken of in the earlier pretzel post, raising the pH promotes this chemical reaction that leads to the formation of more brown pigments and a more intense roasty aroma. That’s exactly what happens in my beloved Min Chiang Kueh, or so I believe to be true, as how else would it be possible to get such a lovely dark brown sheen by merely pan-heating the batter on medium heat for 3-5 min, without developing a crisp crust?

That said, now that we know what the alkaline solution is for, there’s no need to comb the country to find ‘alkaline water’ on the retail shelves (they sell it in baking stores in Singapore for several other Asian food applications), as sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) I have used, worked perfectly well too. Yeast was my trusty leavener, conferring a nice bready flavour to the thick pancake that was porous enough to yield a satisfyingly soft yet chewy texture. Definitely one of my favourite Singaporean snacks!

Min Chiang Kueh / Apam Balik Recipe adapted from Lee Lee

Pancake

  • 150g plain flour
  • 10g corn / potato / rice flour (for a more tender texture)
  • 250ml warm water
  • 30g sugar
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp instant yeast

Filling

  • 50g peanuts
  • 12g sesame
  • 25g sugar
  1. To make the filling, pulse the peanuts and 50g of sugar in a food processor (not too fine, nice to have some peanut bits to chew on). Mix in sesame seeds. (Or make more and store for the next time you make the pancake!)
  2. Mix all the pancake ingredients together and go do some studying for 1 hour.
  3. The batter gets all puffed up and sticky — add additional water (~50ml) to get a consistency that will flow on the pan.
  4. Use a paper towel and grease the surface of a 30cm diameter non-stick frying pan. Heat pan on medium heat.
  5. Pour half of the batter into the pan, swivel pan to spread evenly, and cover pan with a lid.
  6. Pancake is done when the top surface just completely dries out (about 5 min).
  7. Remove from pan and make the second pancake (batter makes two ~25cm pancakes).
  8. Spread a generous portion of peanut filling on one half of the pancake and fold over. Cut and serve!

Just 5 min of preparation, 1h of proofing (go do something useful meanwhile), and 15min of pancake-making. Creating delicious snacks hardly gets any easier than this!

All packed up for sharing! πŸ™‚

Orange Overload!

In Dutch, Eats on May 5, 2010 at 11:13 am

It was great to be back in NL, even better that it was QUEEN’S DAY and SPRING! The Dutch sure are one crazy bunch of party-ers with their wild spirit of wacky orange party antics! With the biggest annual Dutch celebration of the Queen’s (mother’s) birthday, orange is the colour to be in and partying is the central activity on the agenda. But despite being one of the most creative and comedic bunch of people I’ve ever met (when it involves partying or funny random discussions), they aren’t exactly the most adventurous when it comes to food (or as the saying goes: Wat de boer niet kent dat eet hij niet / what the farmer does not know, he does not eat LOL)…..but WAIT, don’t go yet, I’ve still got some treats coming up for you!

Although I once complained loads about the monotony of breakfasting on bread with excessively sweet toppings, lunching on the same bread with ham and gouda cheese (one cheese, one ham to be specific. unexplainable.), dinner on potato mashes (stamppot)… and snacking on cakes and cookies of every shape and size of the same flavours (butter or speculaas)…..experiencing Dutch again after being away for 3 months in Copenhagen was surprisingly comforting. Now, ontbijtkoek (spiced breakfast cake) and broodje hagelslag (bread with chocolate sprinkles) possesses a new charm for me- a feeling of comfort and familiarity that tugs at the heart the way ice-cream sandwiches and kaya toast does for homesick Singaporeans. That’s when I realized I’ve been such a food snob* to judge the Dutch for what is simply Culture.

*’anyone who practises overt social or cultural bias… who insist too loudly on a scale of values’ -Alain de Botton
hagelslag | stroopwafel |ontbijtkoek | fluffybread | bischuit | gouda cheese | bapao | littleparties | bigparties | soppymusic | dutchbarstandards | orangefever | multitaskingcyclists | dutchifiedindonesianess | coolbunchofwagbuddies… miss them alllll!:)

If you’re not in the Netherlands and don’t have access to a whole supermarket shelf of hagelslag varieties, you’ve gotta grab some plain ol’ chocolate sprinkles from your baking department and try this:

Generously topped on buttered fluffy bread. Delicious!

PS: I’ve now got an ample supply of ontbijtkoek with me. Any suggestions on NEW ways of eating it are most welcome! πŸ™‚ Maybe brunost. hahaha…. we’ll see! πŸ˜€

FAB – Checkerboard Cookies

In Baking, Friday Afternoon Baking, Recipes on April 24, 2010 at 1:35 am

The difficulties in studying food choice behavior is very much due to how food takes on a multitude of meanings that differ from situation to situation, individual to individual. If eating food were as simple an equation as hunger and satiety, then I believe that with the amount of research done thus far, solving the world’s eating problems should be as easy as pie. But that’s apparently not the case, because when food looks like this:


it is no longer just food for the mouth. LOOK at these butter cookies. Just one GLANCE at these cute squares and I bet you would ignore all hormonal signals of fullness… and despite knowing that there’s probably a 100kcal in each of these evil thingies, you still can’t resist eating 5 of them at one go. Am I right? Am I right?? πŸ˜€

Here, food assumes another purpose that is beyond that of satisfying the body and the senses. The only way it can then fulfill its purpose in existence is for it to be given away to others… to bring about as much joy as possible to as many people as possible. Yes, that must be its mission.

I made these cookies with L and M in mind, two lovely architects whom we (6 of us sensory science students) have been working with for the past two months to conceptualize and realize an odour menu as part of an experimental theatre production (unfortunately the link is only in Danish) at the Temporary National Theatre. Looking back on the two months and six shows, I feel a happy fuzziness inside me that justifies each of those times I dragged my feet to lab to mix odorous chemicals and smelling like I’ve been brewed in beef broth for 24h…. and each of those times I cycled in the cold to get to the Skuespilhuset 45min away from home….I wanted to make something for them that was both delicious and simple (butter cookies) and attractive (definitely not the typical butter cookies), but at the same time embodies some element of drama and incomprehensibility of the Kafka theatre concept. I hope they like it. πŸ™‚ Now I shall divulge the secret of how-to-make-a-checkerboard cookie on this FAB session (okay, alright, you can easily find this on the internet lol)!


Checkerboard Cookies recipe from Martha Stewart

  • 225g butter, unsalted
  • 110g sugar*
  • 2 tsp vanilla essence
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 300g flour (2.5 cups)
  • 2-3 tbsp cocoa powder (13-20g)
  • 1 egg + 1 tbsp water

1. Cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy, then mix in extracts and salt.
2. Combine with flour (I rubbed in with my fingertips)
3. Knead into a dough after all the creamed butter and flour have been combined
4. Divide into 2 equal portions, knead in cocoa powder into one half (careful, the powder tends to spray all over)
5. Roll out into 20cm squares, slightly less than 1 cm thick. (from here you can start referring to the photo below)
6. Cut out nine 1-1.5cm wide strips of each dough and set the remainder aside for the meantime.
7. Stack it up in alternate colours and brush edges with egg wash as you stack them together to help the strips stick together.
8. Roll out the remainder till it’s wide enough to wrap completely the stacked up strips.
9. Wrap in plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator for at least 30min to chill and firm up. Meanwhile heat up the oven at 175˚C.
10. Unwrap and slice the cookies with about 0.5-0.7cm thickness. Bake on a cookie sheet for 12min. They will still be soft when warm. I transferred them to kitchen towels to soak up the excess fat. Cookies are crisp when cool (but not crunchy) like normal butter cookies.
*Cookies weren’t sweet enough so I coated the base by melting some chocolate in the microwave, mixing in a few drops of almond essence into the chocolate, coating the base and leaving them to cool on baking paper. You might want to add 50-100g more sugar to avoid having to use chocolate to sweeten the cookie up, but more chocolate is always good πŸ˜‰

*Note to self: try stacking out new designs! πŸ™‚

Kueh Dadar | Mamee Noodles

In Recipes, Singaporean on April 19, 2010 at 12:38 am

When you’re 10,000km away from home (or 9957km to be exact), some things from childhood have a special power to make you gasp with an irrational amount of joy and act with a ridiculous amount of irrationality (like paying $6 instead of $0.60 for a bite of dorayaki). Well, when you miss home as much as I do, and you want some ‘Mamee’ and ‘Dadar’, the next best option is to buy what you can, and make what you can’t.

Unlike Mamee that is pretty much an emo trip-to-my-childhood, I truly truly love nyonya kuehs. For flavouring ingredients as simple as coconut milk and palm sugar built on common starches like wheat, rice and tapioca, they have a taste and texture so irrepressibly addictive that I just can’t control myself every time I lay eyes on it (HY can vouch for that!). Best of all, it catapults me back home during those few moments of sensory indulgence for a quick and effective dose of anti-homesickness.


My two favourites are kueh dadar and ondeh ondeh, both of which I frequently make as my Singaporean ‘badge’ whenever I attend dinner parties. These ‘green coconut pancakes’ and ‘green bally thingies’ — as my European friends now refer to them– always elicits initial responses of surprise due to their unsettling green luminosity, yet it never takes much persuading to get the plate polished up. Anyway, it was kueh dadar this time — I’ll post on ondeh ondeh the next time I make it, though you’d already catch a glimpse of it in the background of my agar agar cake photo in the earlier post! πŸ˜‰


Kueh Dadar Recipe adapted from Rasa Malaysia

Pancake

  • 120g flour
  • 1 egg
  • 300ml coconut milk
  • pinch of salt
  • 1/2 tsp pandan (screwpine) paste or just green colouring as a lesser alternative

Filling

  • 80g Gula Melaka (palm sugar)
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 80 ml water
  • 120g shredded coconut
  • 1 tsp corn starch
  1. Dissolve the sugars in water in a saucepan and stir in the shredded coconut and corn starch till you get a moist golden brown coconut filling. Leave aside to cool.
  2. Sift flour and salt in a mixing bowl, combine a lightly beaten egg and coconut milk by lightly whisking with a hand whisk. Add the pandan paste and stir till you get a homogenous green pancake batter.
  3. Heat up a non-stick frying pan on medium-low heat and spoon 1-2 tbsp of batter into the centre. Swirl or use the base of the spoon to make a thin pancake of about 15cm in diameter.
  4. When the surface is dries out, transfer to a plate with the top surface facing down (this will be the outside of the Kueh Dadar)
  5. Place two teaspoons of coconut filling on the pancake and roll up like a spring roll.
  6. Best served immediately, but within the same day is fine!

Signs of a Food Obsession

In Danish, Eats, Weirdo Ideas on April 15, 2010 at 10:03 am

#1: You fell in β™₯ at first bite.

The Original Danish Ristet Hotdog

#2: You attempt guilt-reduction by improving its nutritional content

Lower fat version with a low-fat sausage and a toasted multi-grain wholemeal baguette with the same ingredient combinations.

#3: You diversify into new forms while preserving the taste combination you adore

Same ingredients but in a Swedish mjukt tunnbrΓΆd with the softness of a hotdog bun and the goodness of rye.

#4: (ζœ€ι«˜ε’ƒη•Œ Highest Level) You convert the dish to be congruent with your lifestyle and beliefs [for me: a healthy, eco-friendly flexitarian meat-reduced diet]

The same toppings but on boiled potatoes (with the skin on). The crisp bite of the skin perfectly simulates the burst when biting through the skin of a roasted sausage, while the soft bland interior of the potato contrasts nicely with the flavourful and crunchy toppings.

FAB – Fat Free Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

In Baking, Friday Afternoon Baking, Recipes on April 3, 2010 at 11:57 am

Eaters beware: with all this media hype promoting instant solutions to complex eating issues, it’s just so easy to fall into the trap of thinking that labels such as FAT FREE (cookies), CHOLESTEROL FREE (ice cream), NO MSG ADDED (cup noodles) or ONLY NATURAL INGREDIENTS (sweetened jams) are invitations to consume the food freely. Perhaps they might be to some extent more healthful options in relation to their counterpart containing the nutrient / additive specified in the claim, but they are not necessarily ‘healthy’ per se. A health claim is not a passport to gorge yourself with the food item, but simply a piece of information to suggest it might be good if you make a 1-for-1 replacement of whatever full / additive-laden version you’re using right now, and use it like you normally do.

Let’s take the danish yoghurts for example: on a basis of 100g of yoghurt, a pear-banana flavoured regular yoghurt contains 90kcal (12g sugar, 3g fat), low fat 0.5% version contains 70kcal (12g sugar, 0.4g fat), a plain natural yoghurt contains 60kcal (3.5g sugar, 3.5g fat) and the low fat 0.1% version contains 35kcal (3.8g sugar, 0.1g fat). Conclusions: 1. flavoured yoghurts contain significantly more sugar i.e. calories 2. uncontrolled gorging on low fat/fat-free products is not a good idea unless you’re intending to compensate later in the day. Makes sense, right?Β 

That said, here’s a nice fat free oatmeal raisin cookie recipe for you. I have picked this recipe for my FAB because: 1. I’ve got all the ingredients with me (my breakfast material), 2. I love oatmeal raisin cookies, 3. it’s cheap, easy and fast, 4. I’m totally obsessed with chewy snacks and 5. if I can make some good study-snacks, while treating myself to some fibre and cutting the fat— isn’t that perfect?? But if you’re looking for a ‘healthy snack’, from a nutrition point of view, I’d suggest cooking the oats and skimmed milk into oatmeal instead. Nutritious and filling, with fewer empty calories and a lower GI index than these SWEET and ADDICTIVE chewy oatmeal raisin cookies. I’d make these over and over again, if I hadn’t so many recipes I want to try!

Chewy Fat Free Oatmeal Raisin Cookies adapted from Maddie Ruud’s Recipe

  • 1 cup plain flour
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1.5-2 cups rolled oats
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 2 egg whites, lightly beaten
  • 75g sugar, 15g vanilla sugar (or 90g sugar + 1tsp vanilla essence, which I didn’t have)
  • 1/3 cup applesauce (which I didn’t have, so I substituted with 80g pectin-stabilized* apricot jam and cut 25g of sugar off the original recipe containing 115g sugar because that was some really cloyingly sweet jam I had!)
  • 1/2 cup skimmed milk
  • 1 cup raisins
  1. Preheat oven to 190˚C.
  2. Sift together flour, vanilla sugar, baking soda, cinnamon and nutmeg. Stir in rolled oats.
  3. In a separate bowl, mix all other ingredients.
  4. Combine (2) and (3) and mix well.
  5. Drop teaspoon-sized balls of batter onto non-stick cookie sheet.
  6. Bake 12-15 minutes.

(makes 60pcs of 4cm-diameter cookies)

*Here’s an interesting article on pectin-rich material as fat-replacers in cookies.

Recipe alternatives: out of curiosity, I placed some back into the oven to bake for another 3 minutes (tasters said yummy! – harder and less gummy) and some for 6min (too hard!). Still love both though, but I think next time I’ll flatten the cookies more if I were to bake it longer.